911 Public Records Request


Requesting records from YOLO 911
Frequency Asked Questions

 

  1. What is a public record?
  2. According to California Government Code §6250, a public record includes:

    "Public records" includes any writing containing information
    relating to the conduct of the public's business prepared, owned, used, or retained by any state or local agency regardless of physical form or characteristics.

    It is important to note that the California Public Records Act does not require a government agency to create a public record where none exists.  This is especially true when it comes data found in computer systems.

  3. Why do I need to fill out a form?
  4. To streamline the public records request process, YECA has created a standard form.  Using this form will make sure that the YECA Records Custodian understands what information you are requesting, the purpose of your request, what your contact information is and so that YECA has a documented history of the request.

  5. Is there a fee for obtaining public records and if so, how much will it cost?
  6. The cost of your request is dependent on several factors:  the type(s) of records you are requesting, the complexity of your request, and the amount of research staff time is required to procure and produce the records.  In addition to staff time, fees are charged for CD’s and paper copies.  Costs can range anywhere from no charge, if there are no records found to several hundreds of dollars for extensive incident recordings and computer aided dispatch printouts. 

    Please refer to YECA’s 9-1-1Audio & Paper Records Fee Schedule under the Public Records menu tab at www.yeca911.org for a list of common charges.  If fees are expected to exceed the minimum amount, you will be notified of the cost estimate before any production work is done on your request.

  7. Why do I have to pay a fee?
  8. The California Public Records Act authorizes public agencies like YECA to establish reasonable fees to be reimbursed for the actual costs of making the records available.  Actual costs include paper or other media and mailing expenses, as well as time spent locating, reviewing, redacting, copying and supervising a person’s inspection or original records in order to protect them.  Actual costs also may include time spent by an attorney to review, redact or segregate records for possible exemptions.

  9. What happens if you can’t find the records I want, do I still need to pay?
  10. Depending on the complexity off your request and the time spent by the YECA Records Custodian searching for your records, YECA may choose to charge you for the time they spent searching.  You can assist this process by being as specific as possible when you make your written request.

  11. What does it mean if I am told that the records I requested are not available or some of the information is exempt?
  12. In 1999, California Government Code §12236 was adopted and it directed the Secretary of State to establish a Local Government Records Program to provide guidelines and standards for the types of records created and managed to how long the records need to be legally maintained, at minimum.  YECA adopted and complies with the Local Government Records Management Guidelines published by the California Secretary of State’s office, last revised in 2006.   This document can be found at: http://www.sos.ca.gov/archives/local-gov-program/pdf/records-management-8.pdf

    If YECA tells you that the records you have requested are exempt or are no longer available, you will be provided with an explanation, i.e., the record exceeded the retention period and has been destroyed, or the record(s) contain information not subject to public disclosure, in which case, you will be provided with the citation to the relevant law exempting disclosure.

    If you are interested in learning more information about the California Public Records Act, including the types of records or information that is exempt from public disclosure, you can view and download a Summary of the California Public Records Act by visiting http://ag.ca.gov/publications/summary_public_records_act.pdf.

  13. If I have an on-going interest in a particular set of records, may I submit one request and be notified whenever there is an update or new records are available?

    No.  A new request must be made each time you want information.


 

Any further questions please send an email to recordsrequest@yeca911.org or call (530) 666-8900 for more information.

 

 


Mission

“Yolo Emergency Communications Agency, a multi-agency public partnership, with highly-trained professional staff working cooperatively with police, fire and other emergency service personnel, will effectively use technology to provide the highest quality emergency communication and dispatch services to the public it serves.”